Best Twin Sleep Gear for 2016

Parents of twins know that they don’t do twice the work of normal parents, they do four times the work!  They also know that buying two of everything, even buying in bulk, doesn’t begin to solve all their logistical problems. Anything that cuts down on time and toil is a Godsend to the parents of multiples. Here is a sample of what I consider to be the best twin sleep gear available. These make great baby shower presents too (hint, hint)

Best Twin Sleep Gear

As soon as they come home, the twins will need somewhere to sleep. As they get older, they’ll need a safe place to play. This first product combines the two.

Graco Pack ‘n Play Playard with Twins Bassinet

 

Graco makes great stuff. I’ve always loved their strollers. Now they come out with a terrific combination twin bassinet and play yard that has the same sturdy design as their line of strollers. Early models of the Graco play yards were nearly impossible to  set up. It was like playing Twister in a sleep-deprived state. But they’ve solved these design flaws. The result is a beautiful and functional design. It’s also easy to clean – a major bonus!

Arm’s Reach Ideal Arc Original Co-Sleeper Bedside Bassinet.


The Arm’s Reach Co-Sleeper Bassinet began with a mother and father’s need for a safe sleeping environment for their baby. They, like many parents, had rediscovered the benefits of co-sleeping with their infants—increased bonding, ease of feeding and a greater sense of closeness. But they were concerned modern beds weren’t appropriate for a baby’s space. They solved this problem by placing the child at the side of the bed, within arm’s reach. Their result is a wonderful series of bassinets that provide best twin sleep, close to their parents during the important early months of development. Whether you choose to breast feed or bottle feed, the Co-Sleeper Bassinet promotes bonding and enables parents better sleep and provides the best twin sleep possible.

Premium 3 in 1 Travel Bassinet – Diaper Bag & Portable Changing station, Easily Convertible


Have you ever had the experience of seeing a product so cool, so innovative, so overall fantastic that you say “Gee, I wish I had thought of that!!!” This 3-in-1 had that effect on me. Easily convertible from bag into travel bassinet for babies and into a portable changing station. You will love using it on a family beach trip, going to the park, visiting Grandma’s and anywhere.

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Here’s what one happy customer had to say:

This is a really cool product. Some of these baby things seem too good to be true but this one really is what it promises. We have a 2 month old baby and my hands are constantly full with her and all of her stuff. It’s great to have a clean safe place to lay her down anywhere I go and I don’t need any extra hands to carry it. It’s even easier to fold into a diaper bag than I could have imagined; It literally folds in a seconds. And it’s so easy to clean. This would be great for traveling, especially camping. I wish I had this when my older child was a baby as we had to haul a giant pack and play around with us when we could have just brought this smart nursery bag!
It’s perfect for when visiting friends and family members who don’t have baby gear. My little one can and will take a nap anywhere at any time and this best twin sleep napper gives her a secure place to do it.

Baby Jogger City Select with 2nd Seat

If ever there were a “niche” product idea, this was it: a twin jogging stroller. Whether you’re looking for a travel system, a pram, a double stroller, a triple, or just a single, the City Select could be the only stroller you’ll ever need. The most versatile stroller on the market today, the City Select was designed to keep your family rolling as it grows from one child to two. I suspect that you may not be able to achieve actual jogging speed with this thing, but you will certainly get a workout. The wheels are best for paved terrain, and I would be careful going up and down kerbs. The remainder of the design, however, is sturdy and light enough for an average mortal to handle!

Stuff 4 Multiples Twin Carrier, Twingaroo


We’ve saved the best for last. I love all of Stuff 4 Multiples gear, but this is their signature product and they are justifiably proud of it. Its unique design distributes the weight of your babies and diaper bag contents evenly. It’s the only twin carrier on the market that offers you a complete hands-free experience.

I’m not alone in my praise of the Twingaroo. Here’s what another happy customer said:

I absolutely LOVE my Twingaroo ! The weight distribution is AMAZING and you actually feel nothing, even when carrying both babies ! I like that the front panel can be flipped into the belt pocket, so that when you only carry one child, you don’t have to deal with extra fabric coming out of nowhere ! And the backpack is SO big and useful ! I really loved that, unlike other carrier of the same type (that I tried before getting my Twingaroo), it adjust perfectly to everybody ! My men, my grandma, my aunt and me (we all are from very different body type) have all been able to adjust it perfectly!

 

Bottle or Binky in Bed: Bad Idea!

Have you done this? This is for you parents who said they’d never do it. Your toddler sleeps with a bottle or binky in her mouth. You said you’d never do it, but there it is! How did it happen?

The Slippery Slope

It’s a real thing, folks. When you step out on to the edge of the slippery slope you end up at the bottom before you know what happened. bottle or binky 2

I’ve been there. Trust me, I know what it’s like to suffer from toddler-induced sleep deprivation. You will do anything (within reason) to get the little one to settle.

Perhaps you’ve even said this to yourself: “I’ll give her the bottle or binky just this once. I don’t want it to become a habit. I just need to get to sleep!”

A week, maybe a month later, you remember what you said to yourself and the feeling of guilt creeps in. Because the binky is still in the toddler’s mouth, or the bottle is still in the crib. I’ve been there as well.

The Problems Bottle or Binky Cause

Things seem ok for now. She’s sleeping after all, isn’t she?

bottle or binky1
Is that juice in that bottle?

Yes. For now she is. But what if the binky falls out and she goes looking for it? If she doesn’t find it and wakes up fully, she’ll be pissed! This is because the object in her mouth has become a sleep association. That is to say, something that she associates with going to sleep. If that thing is no longer present when she arrives at a shallow sleep phase in a couple hours, she may go looking for it and fully rouse herself.

What about her new teeth? Could they grow in crookedly because of the rubber object in her mouth 8 hours straight? Yes, it could happen. She might also increase her risk for ear infections.

Then there’s the speech thing.

Don’t Talk With Your Mouth Full!

I have met dozens of mothers who worry that their toddlers aren’t speaking when they should. One look at the toddler can tell the story. If her mouth is full of binky, or if she has a bottle hanging from her lips at all times, she probably is going to have a tough time speaking! I’ve consulted on toddlers who do manage to learn to speak around their binkies, but I must say this is rare. Suffice to say these kids aren’t easy to understand. A friend who is a speech pathologist has managed more than one case by simply popping the binky out of her patient’s mouth!

More Teeth Problems

Another typical “slippery slope” story is the problem of “milk bottle cavities“. I’ve seen my fair share of kids who’s mouths look like this:

bottle or binky
Sorry for the disturbing photo, folks

It turns out that bacteria love sugar. When you bathe baby teeth in sugar for several hours at a time, bacteria that cause cavities have a feast! I know that these parents never wanted their toddler’s two top teeth to rot! I know they only wanted the little one to get to sleep and this was the “only way” to get it done. Well, of course it wasn’t the only way, but once you step out onto that slippery slope, you end up at the bottom before you know what hit you.

The sugar in breast milk or formula is fine for your baby; you’d have to admit it’s good for her! But it is meant to be sucked down and swallowed. Milk was never meant to pool in a human’s mouth for any length of time. The effect on teeth tells the story.

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What goes for milk goes triple for juice. Juice is not fruit. Juice is flavored sugar dissolved in water. There is no good dietary reasons for your baby to consume sugar. How much more so is there no reason for sugar-water to swirl around in her mouth. It does nothing but provide a tasty meal for those bacteria!

Bottle or Binky Before Bed?

As I’ve said before, I’m a big fan of the binky. It can be the breastfeeding mom’s best friend for the first six months of the baby’s life. Prior to 4-6 months, your baby needs some external source of soothing. Beyond this point, the baby is able to do it herself, so she doesn’t need soothing aids. This is when the binky becomes something much less than a friend. It becomes a habit that you desperately wish you had broken earlier. The longer you wait, the tougher it gets. A “window of opportunity” begins to close at around 9 months. By one year of life it takes a strong parent indeed to pry the window open again!

bottle or binky 4
Now see? She’s addicted to it!

As for the bottle, it has no place in the crib, ever.

If you absolutely must give a bottle to a toddler in a crib, it should be a bottle of water (sugar-free) and you should do this only on one particular situation (discussed in “The Three Temptations“). After the child has had her sip, she doesn’t need it any more and you can take it away.

Spiked Shoes

I once heard an ethicist say he wished he could climb down the slippery slope with spiked shoes. Sorry. You can’t do that. No one can. The best way to fix the problem of a toddler who won’t sleep without a bottle or binky is never to give either in order to make them sleep. For a binky, you have some leeway until 6 months. With the bottle, it should be easier:

Just. Say. No.

Climbing Back Up the Slope

But if you do find yourself at the bottom of that slippery slope, not all hope is lost. If your toddler really needs something with her in bed, you can replace the bottle or binky with another transitional (or comfort) object. Whatever it is, it should be something she can put in her mouth that will be safe for her. A blanket or stuffed animal can be a good substitute.

Another trick that works well for some parents is a “goodbye” ritual, timed to coincide with a big event like a birthday. My sister prepared a goodbye ceremony for her daughter’s binky when the girl turned 3. They went and threw away all the binkies in the dumpster, and then and bought a nice present for the little girl. My niece was very enthusiastic about the entire thing.

Of course, it’s ideal to be able to avoid transitional objects and goodbye rituals in the first place!

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How to Get Your Toddler to Sleep in Her Own Bed

Half the battle is over: You moved the baby from a crib to her own bed.

Well… let’s say that one-quarter of the battle is over. Now you have to figure out a way to get her to sleep in her own bed. Maybe you’re one of the lucky few whose sweet little angel sleeps all night in her brand new bed. Not likely, though. Here’s how to close the deal:

How to Get Your Toddler to Sleep in Her Own Bed

Step One: Lay the Groundwork

If possible, let the toddler know her “big girl/big boy” bed is coming. This may not be possible if you had to buy the bed in a hurry on the day she climbs out of the crib for the first time. But if you do get the chance, let the little one know that a terrific present is coming. If she can stand it, you might even go shopping for the bed with her. Be as positive about the event as possible. If you are genuinely enthusiastic about the toddler bed, she’ll pick up on your enthusiasm.

Some parents score by buying the bed and setting it up in the toddler’s room before she makes the transition. You might even have her try to take a nap in it. This is a similar technique that works in toilet training: you introduce the potty long before the child actually sits on it to poop! In a similar way, the toddler bed becomes an “acquaintance” before it becomes a “friend”.

What if There’s No Time to Lay the Groundwork?

What if one day you hear “the thud” followed by the cry of the frightened toddler who didn’t realize it was that far to the floor when she climbed over the rail? No time to introduce the bed (although there may be time to shop)? In this case, you may need to rush the process of introducing the her own bed… like down to less than a day. Your toddler might not like the idea of such a dramatic change. I understand.

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But changes happen in her life, often suddenly and she always adjusts. This time will be no different.

Step Two: Be Consistent

One thing doesn’t have to change, and that’s your bedtime routine. For me, the “bedtime routine” begins at dinner. After that time, every single thing that happens is regular and predictable. Dinner should be at the same time. Bath at the same time. Book reading at the same time. Everything. Consistency is the key to troubleshooting any sleep issue and this one is no different.

own bed
They’re not sleeping, but they’re happy!

As long as you are staying consistent, it is best to use the same mattress she slept on in the crib, with the same sheets and bedding. Most toddler beds are designed to accommodate a standard crib-size mattress. Perhaps you had already splurged and purchased a crib that converts to a toddler bed. Even better! The point here is that the surface the toddler lays on will feel exactly the same as the crib. This is important to her keeping good sleep associations. You might even consider placing the toddler bed in the same place where the crib stood.

Step Three: Set Limits

If you have a perfectly normal bedtime routine and your little one drifts off to a blissful sleep, then you’re done. But more likely than not, your toddler is going to want to get out and find you at night. Most likely this will happen sooner rather than later.

If you have not done so already, this is the time to baby-proof your house. Gates should be placed on stairs. Cords and outlets should be safely secured and out of reach. Every item of furniture that could be pulled down, including chests of drawers, should be secured.

If you haven’t gotten into the habit of setting limits with your child, this would be a terrific night to get started. The first limit ought to involve your bed. Just because the little one has her own bed, doesn’t mean she can sleep in any bed, least of all yours. Now, some parents are fine with this and I cannot judge them. However, if any or all occupants of the bed are not okay with this arrangement, then it’s not okay, period! Also ask yourself if you still want the little one in your bed in four months. Or what if there’s a new baby coming? What if the new baby has already arrived? Clearly, a limit should be set.

own bed
Now THAT’S what I’m talkin’ about!

The limit goes something like this: “You’ve got your own bed. [Partner] and I have our own bed. Everybody sleeps in their own bed!” Simple and matter-of-fact. No reasoning and explanation is required. If you do not know already, you should know that your toddler does not care about reasons! All she wants to know is: What are the limits and are you (mom) going to enforce them?

Step Four: Enforce Them

Here’s the toughest part. Once a limit is set, it’s got to be enforced. Among the worst things you can teach a child is that the limits you set are phony and you aren’t really serious about them. Children who grow up without enforced limits are more anxious and less happy. They may not show it, but they need limits! Kids test limits not because they are unhappy or imp-ish, but because they need to know that the limits are there and are being enforced by the “Limits Setter(s)”.

Every time she gets out of bed and comes to yours, you should bring her back to her own bed. The tough part of this act is doing it calmly and without emotion. I cannot stress this enough. Remember: no explanation or reason is going to help. It’s just wasted breath. Your toddler is never going to say to you “Gee, Mom! I never thought of it that way! Thank you for explaining it to me”.

Step Five: She’s Got Her Own Bed, Now She’s Got to…

When you return her to own bed, the routine should be the same. Brief, matter-of-fact, and to the point. This is much easier said than done. Your toddler’s main job in life is to find the chinks in your armor and plunge through them. Maybe she’ll ask for water, or a bottle (don’t get me started on this one!) It will be tough, but you are tougher. Stay firm, stay calm, and stay consistent.

The Easier-Said-Than-Done List

  • Be Consistent: Keep the entire bedtime routine exactly the same as it was when she slept in a crib.
  • Set Limits: Everybody sleeps in their own bed. Children thrive on limits. Without them they are lost.
  • Enforce the Limits: No limit is any good if you don’t enforce it. Remain calm. Take deep breaths. And enforce the limits you set. You’ll be glad you did. So will your toddler.

Best Toddler Beds

Half the battle is over: You’ve moved the baby from a crib to her own toddler beds.

own bed
A bed of her own

Well… let’s say that one-quarter of the battle is over. Now you have to figure out a way to keep her in the toddler bed. Maybe you’re one of the lucky few whose sweet little angel sleeps all night in her brand new bed. Not likely, though. Here’s how to close the deal:

Toddler Beds

If possible, let the toddler know her “big girl/big boy” bed is coming. This may not be possible if you had to buy the bed in a hurry on the day she climbs out of the crib for the first time. But if you do get the chance, let the little one know that a terrific present is coming. If she can stand it, you might even go shopping for the bed with her. Be as positive about the event as possible. If you are genuinely enthusiastic about the toddler bed, she’ll pick up on your enthusiasm.

Some parents have had success by buying the bed and setting it up in the toddler’s room before she makes the transition. You might even have her try to take a nap in it. This is a similar technique that can be successful in toilet training: the potty is introduced long before the child actually sits on it to poop! In a similar way, the toddler bed can become an “acquaintance” before it becomes a “friend”.

What if There’s No Time to Lay the Groundwork?

own bed
See? She LOVES it!

What if one day you hear “the thud” followed by the cry of the frightened toddler who didn’t realize it was that far to the floor when she climbed over the rail? No time to introduce the bed (although there may be time to shop)? In this case, you may need to rush the process of introducing the her own bed… like down to less than a day. Your toddler might not like the idea of such a dramatic change. That’s understandable.

But changes happen in her life, often suddenly and she always adjusts. This time will be no different.

Be Consistent

One thing doesn’t have to change, and that’s your bedtime routine. For me, the “bedtime routine” begins at dinner. After that time, every single thing that happens is regular and predictable. Dinner should be at the same time. Bath at the same time. Book reading at the same time. Everything. Consistency is the key to troubleshooting any sleep issue and this one is no different.

own bed
They’re not sleeping, but they’re happy!

As long as you are staying consistent, it is best to use the same mattress she slept on in the crib, with the same sheets and bedding. Most toddler beds are designed to accommodate a standard crib-size mattress. Perhaps you had already splurged and purchased a crib that converts to a toddler bed. Even better! The point here is that the surface the toddler lays on will feel exactly the same as the crib. This is important to her keeping good sleep associations. You might even consider placing the toddler bed in the same place where the crib stood.

Set Limits

If you have a perfectly normal bedtime routine and your little one drifts off to a blissful sleep, then you’re done. But more likely than not, your toddler is going to want to get out and find you at night. Most likely this will happen sooner rather than later.

If you have not done so already, this is the time to baby-proof your house. Gates should be placed on stairs. Cords and outlets should be safely secured and out of reach. Every item of furniture that could be pulled down, including chests of drawers, should be secured.

If you haven’t gotten into the habit of setting limits with your child, this would be a terrific night to get started. The first limit ought to involve your bed. Just because the little one has her own bed, doesn’t mean she can sleep in any bed, least of all yours. Now, some parents are fine with this and I cannot judge them. However, if any or all occupants of the bed are not okay with this arrangement, then it’s not okay, period! Also ask yourself if you still want the little one in your bed in four months. Or what if there’s a new baby coming? What if the new baby has already arrived? Clearly, a limit should be set.

own bed
Now THAT’S what I’m talkin’ about!

The limit goes something like this: “You’ve got your own bed. [Partner] and I have our own bed. Everybody sleeps in their own bed!” Simple and matter-of-fact. No reasoning and explanation is required. If you do not know already, you should know that your toddler does not care about reasons! All she wants to know is: What are the limits and are you (mom) going to enforce them?

Enforce Them

Here’s the toughest part. Once a limit is set, it’s got to be enforced. Among the worst things you can teach a child is that the limits you set are phony and you aren’t really serious about them. Children who grow up without enforced limits are more anxious and less happy. They may not show it, but they need limits! Kids test limits not because they are unhappy or imp-ish, but because they need to know that the limits are there and are being enforced by the “Limits Setter(s)”.

Every time she gets out of bed and comes to yours, you should bring her back to her own bed. The tough part of this act is doing it calmly and without emotion. I cannot stress this enough. Remember: no explanation or reason is going to help. It’s just wasted breath. Your toddler is never going to say to you “Gee, Mom! I never thought of it that way! Thank you for explaining it to me”.

She’s Got Her Own Bed, Now She’s Got to…

When you return her to own bed, the routine should be the same. Brief, matter-of-fact, and to the point. This is much easier said than done. Your toddler’s main job in life is to find the chinks in your armor and plunge through them. Maybe she’ll ask for water, or a bottle (don’t get me started on this one!) It will be tough, but you are tougher. Stay firm, stay calm, and stay consistent.

The Easier-Said-Than-Done List

  • Be Consistent: Keep the entire bedtime routine exactly the same as it was when she slept in a crib.
  • Set Limits: Everybody sleeps in their own bed. Children thrive on limits. Without them they are lost.
  • Enforce the Limits: No limit is any good that is not enforced. Remain calm. Take deep breaths. And enforce the limits you set. You’ll be glad you did. So will your toddler.

Transition Time: When to Move From Crib to Bed

I have a confession. Whenever parents ask me when to transition their toddler from the crib to a bed, I’m tempted to give a smart-aleck answer. “When she leaves for college”. Even though I sound like a jerk when I say it, there’s a reason for my answer, as you’ll see.

I know that parents are really asking a different question. It depends on the age and developmental stage of the toddler. Maybe they are expecting a new baby. I asked myself the same question twice, once for each boy. There was a different answer for each one, which I’ll get to.

The Transition Question

Many parents are justifiably afraid that the toddler is going to climb out of the crib and hurt herself. This is totally understandable. Surely we’d like to be able to predict the very moment that the toddler becomes physically able to climb out of the crib, and transition her to a bed the day before!

Unfortunately, it’s difficult to know when exactly she’ll have the upper body strength and coordination to accomplish the escape maneuver. And even if she is both strong enough and coordinated enough, it is not a stone-cold certainty that she’ll use those abilities.

I know, I know… it’s like Murphy’s Law of Toddlers: if she can do it, she will do it.  Perhaps, but not necessarily.

transition
I’m bushtin’ outta here, shee?

So it may be impossible to know when exactly when she’ll try to make her getaway, but she’ll probably give you clues. Most toddlers will try to climb out right in front of their parents! The first move, and this is a key one, is to get one leg to the top of the rail and to work it over as in this picture.

Stand and Deliver

One thing is for certain: no toddler is going to climb out before she can stand up on her own! When your toddler can do this, it’s time to lower the mattress so that the rail is relatively higher. I recommend lowering it as far as it will go. One web site even recommends performing surgery on your crib to lower the mattress all the way to the floor. I don’t recommend doing this unless you are absolutely certain that a) you won’t destroy the crib in the process and b) the crib continues to be a safe place for the toddler to sleep. In other words, you don’t want the mattress or parts of the toddler to get stuck on underneath the crib!

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Murphy’s Law for Toddlers in Action

If your toddler is doing the “leg thing” despite your having lowered the mattress as far as it can go, it’s time to transition to a bed. Here’s why (and it’s the main point of this post):

The crib has one purpose and one purpose only: to keep your child safe. The moment the crib stops being a safe place for her, you need to move her out.

Some parents try to prevent the child from escaping with tents or other contraptions. I’m not even going to provide a link to these devices. Murphy’s Law applies. At best, toddlers figure out how to climb out despite the tent. At worst, they kids get stuck and hurt themselves. I do not recommend tents. If your toddler is motivated enough, she will find a way out.transition

Moving Day

No one wants to risk a toddler hurting herself badly. I’m certain that there have been some very bad accidents resulting from a crib escape attempt. Here’s the thing, though: in over 20 years I’ve never seen one. I’ve seen injuries from babies rolling out of bed (don’t get me started on that one!) I’ve seen injuries from falls down stairs. I’ve seen injuries from dad’s tripping over toddler gates while holding the baby in his arms… but never a crib escape injury. I don’t say that to give you the green light to let your toddler climb out. I only say it to try and reassure you that if she climbs out, the result is probably not going to be catastrophic.

So when to parents typically make the transition? The honest answer is: the day they hear the “thud” of the sound of the toddler having made a successful escape. I call this “moving day”.

This is that day that parents rush out and buy a bed if they have not already done so. I cannot blame them. Remember: the crib is meant to keep the baby safe. It has no other purpose. The moment it stops doing its job is the moment to move her out! This was the case for our first child. We heard the thud. We bought the bed. Easy decision.

New Arrival

transition
Life is a transition

Another common reason for making the transition is that mom is expecting a new baby, and there’s only one crib. In these cases, common sense tells you that you should move the toddler out well before baby comes home. That way, the toddler won’t feel like her place is being taken over by the intruder. Even though this is common sense, I have to confess I do not know if the idea has ever been tested! I have never seen or read of any cases where the toddler was kicked out of her crib on the day the baby comes home. So the truth is, we don’t know what the effect will be.

One thing is for certain. If mom is pregnant, the toddler knows that something is going on. Mom’s behavior changes: she’s tired more often, maybe she’s grumpier than usual. Maybe the stress level in the house is rising. Toddlers read all these signals and respond to them. I’m not sure the timing of the transition makes all that much of a difference: the toddler already knows that something is going on and may be anxious about it.

About those explanations…

It doesn’t do much good to explain to her that there’s a baby in mom’s belly. Even if your toddler is intelligent enough to understand it, there’s no way she’ll be prepared when the new baby arrives. Here’s why: there’s no way YOU will be prepared when the new baby arrives! Even though you understand it conceptually and intellectually, you are never prepared for the reality. How much more so for a toddler who hasn’t developed abstract reasoning skills!

Some experts recommend making the transition when the baby comes home from the hospital. The theory is that the baby will be sleeping in moms room for around four months, so the toddler would have time to adjust to the new situation. Again, I get it. It makes sense. But I have no idea if the psychology works.

The best advice I can come up with is this: have the toddler sleeping elsewhere before you put the baby down in the crib. How you get it done is entirely your choice.

We Really Need the Room

transition
Seasons change. So do beds

What if the child never climbs out? Is it possible to keep her in the crib for too long? I’m not sure it is possible! This is why I make the joke about college. Remember, the purpose of the crib is safety. As long as she’s sleeping safely, why rock the boat?

By the time Boy#2 was about 2 1/2, he had not ever tried to climb out of his crib. Maybe he was physically able. He simply didn’t want to climb out. But his 5 year-old brother was sleeping in his own bedroom, and we really wanted to convert the nursery into an office. So at dinner one night we asked the boys “Would you guys like to share a room?” We asked this while nodding our heads and smiling (I call this “the Jedi Mind Trick“). They enthusiastically agreed and that was that.

The next day Boy#2 had his bed. The transition didn’t go so well. He refused to sleep in his new bed, but he did agree to sleep on the floor next to it. Problem solved.

Transition Points

Making the transition from crib to bed is never easy. Sometimes it’s traumatic, for parents as well as the toddler. How to smooth the transition is the subject of another post. But the decision of when to make the move should be easy:

  • If she climbs out of the crib, the crib is no longer a safe place to sleep. Time to move!
  • If she doesn’t climb out, and she’s sleeping well, there’s no reason to rush the move.
  • If you need the crib for a new baby, make the transition before you’re ready to put the little one in the crib, but exactly when you do this does not matter much.

 

transition3 transition2 transition1